Windows 10 April 2018 Update


#1

Windows 10 April 2018 Update

Earlier this week, Microsoft started to roll out the next big update for Windows, which they name the Windows 10 April 2018 Update. It is installed through an update called Feature update to Windows 10, version 1803, and includes a number of changes to Windows.

This is a major update, comparable to what service packs once were, and with the increased amount of changes there is also an increased chance of something not playing nicely with your existing software or hardware. Some of our community members have already installed the update on their V and have shared their findings, and in a few cases issues did arise.

This is a good moment to remind people that it is important to regularly make back-ups of any important files stored on your device. Always. Not just when installing large Windows updates.

But especially when installing large Windows updates.

Back-ups? What? How?

So what are important files? The short answer: it depends. If you don’t want to lose it and it’s not stored anywhere else but on your device, that’s the kind of thing you want to back up. To one user, it may be photos. To another it may be a music collection. To a third it may be a configuration file to get their software set up just right. Keeping these files safe can be as simple as copying them to an external hard drive, USB stick or cloud storage. You can do this manually, though third-party software does exist to automate the process.

The files that make up Windows can be re-installed by downloading and re-installing Windows from the Microsoft website (you can find more information about this in this article). The same applies to most software: MS Office, Adobe CC, and other programs can often just be re-installed, so backing them up is usually not a priority.

If you do wish to have Windows and your software included in the back-up, you could look into making a Windows System Image Back-up (more details in this Windows Central article, or use third-party back-up or cloning tools.

Impact on the V

update!
Earlier this week this article from Microsoft revealed that there are some issues with this update and ‘select devices with certain Intel SSDs’, though they did not specify which SSD models were affected. Now from this article we know that the Intel 600P SSD used in the 128, 256 and 512GB models of the V are among the affected drives. This also explains some of the issues that were reported by community members earlier.

Microsoft has disabled the update on computers using these SSDs, so both the automatic Windows update and the manual update installer should no longer work on the V.

If you have already updated your V with the Windows 10 April 2018 Update and there were no issues, then you are fine. If you have tried to update but ran into issues, Microsoft recommends reverting to Windows 10 version 1709 as described in this article.

If you have not yet updated your V, the update will not be available for the time being. You will still receive security updates and the like, so you will only miss out on the newly introduced Windows 10 features for now. Microsoft has informed Eve that an update will follow later this month that will resolve the issue and make the feature update available again.

It is also possible that Windows Update still finds the 1803 update is available for your V, and can successfully download that. But then when installing, it shows the following error message.


Microsoft confirms April update is not compatible with Intel 600p drives
Update 11.05 Partial.ly, shipping estimator, Windows 10 update
#2

@Helios - I contacted support, to ask if they have tried updating themselves. What driver versions they had installed, what was successful etc. I was disappointed, I was told that support would be reactive not proactive. Really my NPS score for EVE moved from a ‘5’ out of ‘10’ - meh to ‘3’ with that response.

Why isn’t EVE trying to be proactive - figure which configurations will work?

Mark


#3

There are quite a lot of post’s around one could easily define as proactive.
If my understanding is correct support test the most interesting ‘finds’ in order to make them ‘official’.


#4

Any firmware update on the horizon btw? why so much delay? Theres two months since closed testing. If it’s going to take longer, can I be given access to a beta version? There’s a few months that I can’t use the v due to borked insiders W10 bootloop, effectively and ironically locked by the efing non-configurable secureboot.


#5

You could ask the support to give you the original BIOS and ISO for Windows, I guess. Shouldn’t be a problem to circumvent that loop with that. Then you don’t have to wait for the new BIOS version in the meantime.


#6

“it is important to regularly make back-ups of any important files stored on your device.”

How to back up? What important files to be backed iup??:thinking:


#8

I would suggest to post your comment on the thread about the user’s manual…


#9

Uh, saw this thread too late, so cross post:

If you want to delay the Windows update until a time of your choosing, you may want to try this:

http://greatis.com/blog/stopupdates10


#10

In light of your question, I’ve updated the original post with the following:


So what are important files? The short answer: it depends. If you don’t want to lose it and it’s not stored anywhere else but on your device, that’s the kind of thing you want to back up. To one user, it may be photos. To another it may be a music collection. To a third it may be a configuration file to get their software set up just right. Keeping these files safe can be as simple as copying them to an external hard drive, USB stick or cloud storage. You can do this manually, though third-party software does exist to automate the process.

The files that make up Windows can be re-installed by downloading and re-installing Windows from the Microsoft website (you can find more information about this in this article). The same applies to most software: MS Office, Adobe CC, and other programs can often just be re-installed, so backing them up is usually not a priority.

If you do wish to have Windows and your software included in the back-up, you could look into making a Windows System Image Back-up (more details in this Windows Central article, or use third-party back-up or cloning tools.


#11

#12

I had to reinstall windows from scratch ;-/ until today everything works great. Today I noticed that when Eve is not plug in to power adapter I have a lot of BSOD. When I plug it in it works fine.


#13

Will this update be “built-in” in the future Vs and if so which costumers will have this advantage?


#14

@AML by proactive - why doesn’t EVE upgrade devices with different CPU/RAM configs and different drivers up to the Windows 10 Redstone 4?

Here is my fear - my adequate little computer could go from being a fun travel machine to a relative boat anchor if I don’t have the right drivers installed. Or perhaps the first version of Redstone 4 should avoided altogether. Right now I don’t know and the lack of any real information from EVE itself is disappointing.


#15

Sure!
The root of the problems seems to be mostly found in the windows 1803 update(s) and/ or other windows quirks.
That causes a lot of the V “problems and so on’s”.

For example my V freezes up to ten times a day under the Opera browser. The temporary work-around is strange too, but works: fold the V (keyboard-against-screen) and open it again; log in and keep working.
The cure has to come from a windows correction update.

The best strategy seems to be found in the old saying: “If it ain’t broke don’t fix it”. :thinking:


#16

I would recommend NOT updating for now until there is an official fix/patch from Microsoft. This update is a shitshow practically everywhere

The problem is, you probably don’t want this. I personally upgraded 16 PCs to 1803, and the percentage of them that had major issues is in double digits, with major issues as those that render the PC virtually unusable in a production environment and require rolling back to version 1709.

I had one machine where the update completely broke Wi-Fi, and another where it would freeze up after anywhere between five minutes and an hour of usage. It’s a known issue that Chrome freezes, and Microsoft is working on a fix.

It affects more complex modern devices with Wi-Fi, Connected Standby, HiDPI display, modern power states of CPU and GPU, etc. Unfortunately, the V belongs to one of them, as well as (this is true) Microsoft’s own Surface as you can tell in the following threads

…and at least 10 more threads about it in Surface communities

Even a biased site like Windows Central, still calls out a few imperfections on the update, albeit not fatal issues (but then again, they are Windows Central)

About Timeline

Timeline is a collection of graphical issues that seem to span across a variety of devices. Timeline is very animation heavy, and it appears Microsoft still has work to do in optimizing those animations. Even on my high-end PC, the animations will often drop frames. On my Surface Studio, the animation doesn’t even display properly. I’ve also had issues with Timeline not showing up at all at times, which is incredibly frustrating.

About Cortana integration

The removal of the Cortana Home UI makes for a clunky, jarring experience, as Cortana is now showing up in multiple places of the OS. This is because Microsoft is in the middle of rethinking Cortana

Please treat this like a Fast Ring Insider Preview update instead of a regular Windows 10 Update, let alone pre-Nadella Windows Update


#17

Heh, just like a normal windows update. :^)


#18

if some of you people can try maybe the may patch to see if there are some resolved problems in it?


#19

Installed the patch, no worries up to now.
Any quirks will be posted. :face_with_thermometer:


#20

Based on my personal testing with it (read: 1 V, 1 notebook, stories of other people on 1803) it’s really hit & miss.
While e.g. my personal V with the latest drivers worked just fine (mostly - everything that uses the GPU-acceleration makes the V ‘stuck’ until I lock & unlock it again) as @Patrick_Hermawan mentioned there are quite a bunch of tales of people with issues that pop up seemingly at random.
Personally I’d recommend everyone to try to postpone the update as long as possible or at least until we’ve got 2-3 more patch tuesdays in so most annoying things are fixed.


#21

Exactly this. Every damn Windows update has had some buggery involved, and I don’t mean the good kind of buggery that involves the butt.

If you think about it, Windows updates are kind of like eve-tech updates: unpredictable as a fkin crapshoot, and sometimes involve random-ass keybaord related stuff like emojis and cuisine.

Best to treat both with the same mentality: it’ll come eventually, and when it does it’ll be awesome so don’t lose your tits about it.

Simple workaround (if you’re on Win 10 Pro):

Go into settings and set to defer feature updates. You’ll still get all the good stuff - security features and all that - but all the updates that cause problems won’t come until after they’ve been mostly ironed out.

There is literally no reason you should not do this. First of all, if you needed to go online to find out how to roll back a buggy windows update, you probably don’t even know what these new features are, much less be going to make much use of them, or at all.

Defer them updates! Let them scrub home users bugtest for you!

P.S. This one time, I was waiting for a friend and I was pretty tired so I let out a big-ass yawn, then a kamikaze bug flew into my mouth and I ate it. So at first I was like :open_mouth: then I was :neutral_face: then I was like :no_mouth:.