Project: Spectrum | Specs & FAQs

sfb

Hey community,

It’s been a while since we refreshed our spec sheet and FAQ, so here’s an update with all the latest information and some new details. As usual, if you have any other questions, be sure to let us know in the comments!

Spec sheet update

Spectrum ES07D01 ES07D02 ES07D03
Size
monitor size 27" diagonal 27" diagonal 27" diagonal
display area 597.7mm x 335.7mm 597.7mm x 335.7mm 597.7mm x 335.7mm
aspect ratio 16 : 9 16 : 9 16 : 9
Image quality
native resolution 2560 x 1440
Quad-HD
2560 x 1440
Quad-HD
3840 x 2160
Ultra-HD ‘4K’
pixel pitch 0.2334mm 0.2334mm 0.1557mm
pixel density 109ppi 109ppi 163ppi
brightness 400cd/m² typical
450cd/m² peak
450cd/m² typical
750cd/m² peak
450cd/m² typical
750cd/m² peak
HDR HDR10 Media Profile
VESA DisplayHDR400 certified
HDR10 Media Profile
VESA DisplayHDR600 certified
HDR10 Media Profile
VESA DisplayHDR600 certified
displayable colors 1.07 billion 1.07 billion 1.07 billion
color gamut 98% DCI-P3
100% sRGB
98% DCI-P3
100% sRGB
98% DCI-P3
100% sRGB
color depth 10-bit (8-bit + A-FRC) 10-bit (8-bit + A-FRC) 10-bit (8-bit + A-FRC)
color accuracy Individual factory calibration
D65 white point
Individual factory calibration
D65 white point
Individual factory calibration
D65 white point
contrast ratio 1000 : 1 typical
10 000 000 : 1 dynamic
1000 : 1 typical
10 000 000 : 1 dynamic
1000 : 1 typical
10 000 000 : 1 dynamic
viewing angles 178° horizontal
178° vertical
178° horizontal
178° vertical
178° horizontal
178° vertical
surface treatment Low-haze, 20% anti-glare Low-haze, 20% anti-glare Low-haze, 20% anti-glare
Speed
response time 1ms 1ms 1ms
frequency range 48Hz – 144Hz 48Hz – 240Hz 48Hz – 144Hz
adaptive sync G-SYNC Compatible certified
FreeSync Premium Pro certified
G-SYNC Compatible certified
FreeSync Premium Pro certified
G-SYNC Compatible certified
FreeSync Premium Pro certified
Technology
panel technology Nano IPS a-Si TFT LCD Nano IPS Oxide TFT LCD Nano IPS Oxide TFT LCD
backlight technology Bottom edge-lit KSF LED Bottom edge-lit KSF LED Bottom edge-lit KSF LED
backlight dimming Yes (global dimming or 8-zone local) Yes (global dimming or 16-zone local) Yes (global dimming or 16-zone local)
curved panel No No No
touch-enabled No No No
pen-enabled No No No
Ports
HDMI 1x
HDMI 2.0a video input
2x
HDMI 2.1 video input
2x
HDMI 2.1 video input
DisplayPort 2x
DisplayPort 1.4 video input
DisplayPort 1.4 video output for daisy-chaining
1x
DisplayPort 1.4 video input
1x
DisplayPort 1.4 video input
USB Type-C 1x
DisplayPort 1.4 video input
SuperSpeed+ USB (USB 3.1 Gen 2, up to 10Gbps) upstream connection to computer
power output up to 20V / 5A (100W, USB PD 3.0)
1x
DisplayPort 1.4 video input
SuperSpeed+ USB (USB 3.1 Gen 2, up to 10Gbps) upstream connection to computer
power output up to 20V / 5A (100W, USB PD 3.0)
1x
DisplayPort 1.4 video input
SuperSpeed+ USB (USB 3.1 Gen 2, up to 10Gbps) upstream connection to computer
power output up to 20V / 5A (100W, USB PD 3.0)
USB Type-C 1x
SuperSpeed+ USB (USB 3.1 Gen 2, up to 10Gbps)
power output up to 5V / 3A (15W)
1x
SuperSpeed+ USB (USB 3.1 Gen 2, up to 10Gbps)
power output up to 5V / 3A (15W)
1x
SuperSpeed+ USB (USB 3.1 Gen 2, up to 10Gbps)
power output up to 5V / 3A (15W)
USB Type-A 2x
SuperSpeed+ USB (USB 3.1 Gen 2, up to 10Gbps)
power output up to 5V / 2A (10W)
2x
SuperSpeed+ USB (USB 3.1 Gen 2, up to 10Gbps)
power output up to 5V / 2A (10W)
2x
SuperSpeed+ USB (USB 3.1 Gen 2, up to 10Gbps)
power output up to 5V / 2A (10W)
3.5mm minijack 1x
headphone / speaker analog audio output from video input source
1x
headphone / speaker analog audio output from video input source
1x
headphone / speaker analog audio output from video input source
USB Type-B 1x
SuperSpeed+ USB (USB 3.1 Gen 2, up to 10Gbps) upstream connection to computer
1x
SuperSpeed+ USB (USB 3.1 Gen 2, up to 10Gbps) upstream connection to computer
1x
SuperSpeed+ USB (USB 3.1 Gen 2, up to 10Gbps) upstream connection to computer
HDCP Yes (HDCP 2.2) Yes (HDCP 2.2) Yes (HDCP 2.2)
Features
simultaneous active inputs Split-screen mode Split-screen mode Split-screen mode
variable overdrive Yes Yes Yes
backlight strobing Yes Yes Yes
built-in speakers No No No
VESA mount compatible Yes (VESA Mounting Interface Standard 100mm x 100mm) Yes (VESA Mounting Interface Standard 100mm x 100mm) Yes (VESA Mounting Interface Standard 100mm x 100mm)
Kensington lock compatible Yes Yes Yes
Adjustment
controls 1x Power button
1x 5-Way joystick (OSD menu controls and quick actions)
Controls are centered on the back of monitor
1x Power button
1x 5-Way joystick (OSD menu controls and quick actions)
Controls are centered on the back of monitor
1x Power button
1x 5-Way joystick (OSD menu controls and quick actions)
Controls are centered on the back of monitor
status lights 1x User-adjustable power indicator light
(default behavior: solid white when on, pulsing white when stand-by)
1x User-adjustable power indicator light
(default behavior: solid white when on, pulsing white when stand-by)
1x User-adjustable power indicator light
(default behavior: solid white when on, pulsing white when stand-by)
OSD Languages 6
English, Chinese, Spanish, German, French, Japanese
6
English, Chinese, Spanish, German, French, Japanese
6
English, Chinese, Spanish, German, French, Japanese
OSD settings 1 Video input source, USB hub input source, 3.5mm output volume, Split-screen, Low-latency mode, Crosshair, Frame rate counter, User presets, HDR, Color space, Brightness, Contrast, Sharpness, Color temperature, Gamma, Backlight dimming, Aspect ratio, Adaptive sync, Overdrive, Backlight strobing, HDMI mode, USB-C bandwidth priority, USB hub, Uniformity correction, OSD language, OSD position, OSD transparency, OSD time-out, LED behavior, LED color, Display device information Video input source, USB hub input source, 3.5mm output volume, Split-screen, Low-latency mode, Crosshair, Frame rate counter, User presets, HDR, Color space, Brightness, Contrast, Sharpness, Color temperature, Gamma, Backlight dimming, Aspect ratio, Adaptive sync, Overdrive, Backlight strobing, HDMI mode, USB-C bandwidth priority, USB hub, Uniformity correction, OSD language, OSD position, OSD transparency, OSD time-out, LED behavior, LED color, Display device information Video input source, USB hub input source, 3.5mm output volume, Split-screen, Low-latency mode, Crosshair, Frame rate counter, User presets, HDR, Color space, Brightness, Contrast, Sharpness, Color temperature, Gamma, Backlight dimming, Aspect ratio, Adaptive sync, Overdrive, Backlight strobing, HDMI mode, USB-C bandwidth priority, USB hub, Uniformity correction, OSD language, OSD position, OSD transparency, OSD time-out, LED behavior, LED color, Display device information
Eve Spectrum Stand
material 2 Anodized cast aluminum Anodized cast aluminum Anodized cast aluminum
vertical tilt 2, 4 Yes (7° down, 23° up) Yes (7° down, 23° up) Yes (7° down, 23° up)
horizontal swivel 2 No No No
pivot 2, 4
(portrait/landscape)
Yes (90° left, 90° right) Yes (90° left, 90° right) Yes (90° left, 90° right)
height adjust 2 Yes (122mm) Yes (122mm) Yes (122mm)
stand removable 2 Yes (with quick-release button) Yes (with quick-release button) Yes (with quick-release button)
Size and Weight
dimensions (without stand)
(W x H x D)
615mm x 363mm x 44mm 3 607mm x 351mm x 44mm 4 607mm x 351mm x 44mm 4
dimensions (stand only)
(W x H x D) 2, 4
200mm x 430mm x 227mm 200mm x 430mm x 227mm 200mm x 430mm x 227mm
dimensions (with stand, landscape)
(W x H x D) 2, 4
607mm x 571mm x 227mm (highest)
607mm x 449mm x 227mm (lowest)
607mm x 571mm x 227mm (highest)
607mm x 449mm x 227mm (lowest)
dimensions (with stand, portrait)
(W x H x D) 2, 4
351mm x 707mm x 227mm (highest)
351mm x 617mm x 227mm (lowest)
351mm x 707mm x 227mm (highest)
351mm x 617mm x 227mm (lowest)
weight 2, 4 2.0kg (stand only) 4.7kg (without stand)
6.7kg (with stand)
2.0kg (stand only)
4.7kg (without stand)
6.7kg (with stand)
2.0kg (stand only)
Electrical and Operating Requirements
power supply External power adapter External power adapter External power adapter
power input 110V - 240V, 50Hz - 60Hz 110V - 240V, 50Hz - 60Hz 110V - 240V, 50Hz - 60Hz
Limited warranty
duration 5 3 years 3 years 3 years
pixel policy 5 ‘Zero bright dot’ pixel policy ‘Zero bright dot’ pixel policy ‘Zero bright dot’ pixel policy
In the box
contents Eve Spectrum
Power adapter
Power cable
Quick start guide
Eve Spectrum
Power adapter
Power cable
Quick start guide
Eve Spectrum
Power adapter
Power cable
Quick start guide

Product is still in development; specifications may be subject to change. | 1 Other OSD features yet to be announced | 2 Stand sold separately | 3 Measurements based on design files | 4 Measurements based on prototype sample | 5 For warranty details or instructions, please refer to the warranty policy

Firmware updates

Low latency mode

Low latency is a mode popular among those who use a TV as a gaming display; it turns off a lot of the image processing and enhancement common in TVs to achieve a noticeable and crucial improvement in input lag and panel responsiveness. Low latency mode in Spectrum works differently, as there is no image post-processing to disable. Instead, it uses a line buffer to streamline input and output refresh rate between 48Hz and 144Hz, reducing frame processing time compared with using a traditional frame buffer.

Crosshair style

From your comments, it’s apparent that a simple dot is the most popular crosshair style preference in our community. We have provided three styles for the firmware team to play with – a dot, a simple cross, and an upside-down triangle for those who want to add a splash of Eve-style to their aim. We are currently exploring letting the user choose their preferred crosshair shape and color, including a dynamic inverted color which makes the crosshair stand out no matter what is in your sights.
crosshairs

Compatibility modes

Earlier firmware versions contained a DisplayPort 1.2 compatibility mode, for use in the rare cases where a device doesn’t quite understand what to make of our DisplayPort 1.4 monitor. Since then, our firmware team has enabled automatic detection of such situations, and Spectrum will now automatically behave like a DP 1.2 monitor if it thinks that showing its true colors might confuse your device.

Instead we have found that some older devices can have similar issues recognizing HDMI 2.1 screens, so our OSD will still feature a compatibility switch… …but it will be for HDMI instead of DP.

The joystick

In a previous topic, we replaced a broken joystick board and mentioned the redesign of our stick. Today, it’s time to upgrade the joystick cap!

P1000468
The cap will be spray painted for added grip in the final product.

Both ends of the joystick have been modified to improve the user experience. The stem which connects to the control board has been adjusted with tighter tolerances, ensuring that the cap to stays firmly in place without the need for glue. It’s length has been reduced to give a more precise control over the stick where you can better feel each satisfying click. To top it all off – quite literally – the cap has been redesigned with a smaller, slightly curved surface that better conforms to the user’s fingertip for comfortable grip.

FAQ

For ease of reference, we’ll refer to the 144Hz QHD model as Model 1, the 240Hz QHD model as Model 2, and the 144Hz UHD ‘4K’ model as Model 3, as listed in the spec table above.

We have combined the questions from previous FAQs with new questions from the community, support, and social media, and have updated the answers. So if you’ve got a question about Spectrum, we might just have your answer here!

Most popular questions

I prefer spec X over spec Y, can we still change that?

This close to mass production, very few things can be changed. Properties such as the panel, size, design, port selection, control placement, and general features, are already locked down. We’re not at the finish line yet, though most changes from here on will likely be minor tweaks and firmware updates. Of course, we will still call on our community to make sure we get the details just right.

It could be that this is not the monitor you’re looking for. Maybe you would have preferred a bigger one, or a smaller one, or one with a different panel type or port selection. That’s okay! Spectrum is the first monitor Eve developed, but there may be many more in the future. Just stay tuned, and let your voice be heard when next we start a monitor project!

Does Spectrum support display stream compression (DSC)?

Display Stream Compression is a technology where a video signal is compressed at the source device and decompressed at the display. This way, more video data can be sent using the same amount of bandwidth, allowing for refresh rates and resolutions that would otherwise be unattainable. It is the reason Spectrum will perform well, even if your computer does not yet have an HDMI 2.1 port.

The standard for this is set by VESA, and they describe the compression as ‘visually lossless’. One reviewer described its effect as such: " And to our eye, even though it is being compressed, there is no fidelity loss. Just way more efficient use of the available bandwidth."

Model 1 supports DSC 1.2 as part of the DisplayPort 1.4 and HDMI 2.0 standards. Models 2 and 3 support DSC 1.2 as part of the DisplayPort 1.4 standard, and DSC 1.2a as part of the HDMI 2.1 standard.

Will these ports suffice?

We get many questions about HDMI 2.1 and DisplayPort 2.0, and whether the port selection we have is suitable for our high-end panels.

Model 1 supports 1x HDMI 2.0a and 3x DisplayPort 1.4 (one of these over USB Type-C). Because the panel doesn’t require any signal beyond what these connections can provide, those are more than sufficient to drive this display at its native resolution and maximum frequency. The only thing HDMI 2.1 might add, is adaptive sync support over HDMI, which would be great for next-gen console users. The scaler upgrade required to make this possible will add a lot to the cost, bringing the price more in line with Model 2, which does already support this.

Models 2 and 3 support 2x HDMI 2.1 and 2x DisplayPort 1.4 (one of these over USB Type-C). HDMI 2.1 is brand new, and these will be some of the first —if not the first— panels to market with this feature. DisplayPort 1.4 supports Display Stream Compression (DSC), which applies what VESA describes as a ‘visually lossless’ compression to the images being sent to the monitor to make better use of the available bandwidth, enabling the high resolutions and refresh rates Spectrum offers. Though we’ve pressed for a scaler that supports the new DisplayPort 2.0 standard, these parts are simply not available yet.

Image quality

Will Spectrum be factory calibrated for color accuracy?

Spectrum will be individually color-calibrated on the production line, to a D65 white point. With the calibration technology now implemented into the firmware, our next prototype production run should let us better test its color performance.

Is a ΔE of <1 (color differences imperceptible to the naked eye) possible off the assembly line?

Yes, but we are evaluating the additional cost and time it will take. The current estimate is that ΔE (Delta E) calibration will add eight to ten minutes per monitor, which about doubles the total time each monitor spends on the factory line. This reduces the production rate and increases cost, which is why most monitors are calibrated for white point only.

Will Spectrum be able to store a color calibration profile?

Though Spectrum will be able to store its own factory calibration file, we were unable to make it possible to store a custom user calibration profile in the firmware.

Will Spectrum use chroma subsampling?

Spectrum will take a chroma 4:4:4 signal, as all PC monitors should. That said, much modern content (not only streaming services but even Blu-ray discs) makes use of 4:2:0 subsampling. If that is the video source, then, of course, we can’t magically make the missing pixel data reappear. Luckily, the difference is negligible when dealing with high-resolution video content.

What does VESA DisplayHDR400/DisplayHDR600 certification mean?

The key requirements for these certifications are high brightness (up to 400 or 600 cd/m² respectively), and 95% coverage of the DCI-P3 color space. It’s not the same HDR experience that some TVs offer today with 1000 nits brightness, and it doesn’t offer OLED’s contrast ratio. But in return for a relatively small one-time certification fee, customers can be assured that our monitor offers at least this level of image quality.

Does Spectrum support Dolby Vision?

Spectrum does not have the 12-bit color depth that is the main requirement for Dolby Vision. It does, however, support HDR10, which is based on a 10-bit signal.

Do contrast ratios on the new oxide panels differ from Model 1?

Based on our tests so far, the contrast ratios do not differ between panels.

What kind of backlight does Spectrum use?

The backlight module uses white LEDs along its bottom edge, and is coated with a nano-particle layer (hence ‘Nano IPS’) that further filters out unwanted light frequencies. This allows for a wider color gamut and more accurate colors. In Spectrum, this coating is based on potassium hexafluorosilicate (K2SiF6), which leads to the more common name ‘KSF LED’ for this type of backlight solution.

Speed

Will Spectrum support variable refresh rates (adaptive sync)?

Spectrum supports the VESA Adaptive Sync standard, allowing for variable refresh rates on PCs and next-gen consoles.

It will be FreeSync Premium Pro certified to ensure smooth compatibility with AMD graphics cards (this standard was formerly known as ‘FreeSync 2’), as well as G-SYNC Compatible certified to ensure excellent compatibility with NVIDIA 10-series graphics cards and newer.

Will there be a G-SYNC or G-SYNC Ultimate version of Spectrum?

No. G-SYNC modules add a lot of additional cost, and our current solution offers a variable refresh rate experience to anyone, whether they have an AMD graphics card or a recent NVIDIA card.

What is Spectrum’s frequency range for adaptive sync?

Adaptive sync will kick in over 48Hz, which is in line with other monitors currently on the market. This means that the frequency range will be 48Hz through each monitor’s maximum refresh rate.

Can Spectrum be used to display content at lower frame rates?

Limitations of the technology used make 48Hz the minimum. However, Spectrum supports low framerate compensation (LFC) and can emulate lower refresh rates. For example, to display 30 frames per second, it will run at 60Hz and refresh twice per frame.

Don’t IPS panels typically max out at 4 ms response time?

1ms is a response time that was previously unthinkable in an IPS panel, and that is part of what makes these panels so awesome. Technology is constantly improving, and with Spectrum, you won’t have to choose between good colors or high speed! LG’s own 27GL850 is already on the market if you want to look into what tests and reviews have been done of their 1ms Nano-IPS panels.

Technology

What is the difference between a-Si and Oxide IPS panels?

a-Si and Oxide refer to the material that makes up one of the layers of the IPS panel. a-Si stands for ‘amorphous silicon’ and has been the most common IPS technology in recent years. The Oxide panels use a new material that allows for the improved performance of Models 2 and 3.

Will Spectrum be affected by IPS glow and backlight bleed?

Nobody wants bleed, but a choice will always have to be made in quality control about what is acceptable, to keep the costs in check. We’re happy to say that so far, black screens look perfect on our prototypes! That said, it’s not magic. It’s an IPS panel, so expect it to behave like an IPS panel.

Are there other monitors out there using these panels?

Yes. LG makes our display panel, and also uses it in their own monitors. Model 1 uses the same panel as LG’s 27GL850; model 3 uses the same panel as the LG 27GN950. Though these monitors share the same display panel, they do not offer the same feature set as Spectrum.

Does Spectrum have a Quantum Dot Enhancement Film (QDEF)?

No. Quantum Dot is a different kind of backlight filter than what is used in our display panel. There is nothing wrong with quantum dots, but the technology is not licensed to all display manufacturers. The results are very similar to what the nano-particle layer accomplishes in our Nano-IPS displays.

Will Spectrum allow single-strobing at 60Hz?

Yes. Though this is generally a feature found in CRT displays, and very, very rare in flat panels, we are aware that it may pair nicely with our pixel-perfect upscaling for retro gaming aficionados.

Will there be a version of Spectrum with built-in speakers?

Not this time around. When we discussed speakers before, there were a few people who really wanted them to keep a clean desk. Most, however, seemed to agree that the sound quality of built-in monitor speakers generally leaves much to be desired, and preferred using higher-quality external speakers or headphones.

Will there be a pen- or touch-enabled version of Spectrum?

We would love to, but after investigating it, we realized it would increase the cost substantially. So we will keep it in mind as a possible future product. Anything is possible!

Does Spectrum have a fan?

We know that some high-end monitors require active cooling. There are no fans in Spectrum. Even so, there seem to be a lot of fans of Spectrum!

Connections

Does Spectrum have a Keyboard/Video/Mouse (KVM) switch feature?

To drive the built-in USB ports, users can choose either the USB-B or a USB-C port for the upstream connection to the computer, and choose which of the two is active from the OSD menu. We didn’t plan on it, but with this option to choose, we’ve effectively built a KVM switch into the monitor.

How are the downstream USB-ports prioritized?

The user can either manually select the source port for the built-in USB hub, or let Spectrum decide. If set to automatic selection, the USB-C port will be used for the hub when USB-C is set as the image source, or the USB-B port will be used for the hub when HDMI or DisplayPort is set as the image source.

Can I drive all the features of Spectrum with a single cable?

With a single cable, Spectrum can power your device, receive a video signal from your device, and enable the use of the other USB ports on the monitor for your device. This requires your device to have a USB Type-C port that supports USB-PD power input, DisplayPort Alternate Mode or Thunderbolt 3 Alternative Mode, and regular USB data. Examples of such devices include the Eve V and MacBook Pro.

What cable do I need to connect Spectrum to my device?

Spectrum can be connected to any DisplayPort port with a DisplayPort cable. To ensure all the monitor’s features are available, make sure the cable is certified ‘DP8K DisplayPort’.

Spectrum can be connected to any USB Type-C port with a USB Type-C cable. To display an image, the source device needs to supports DisplayPort Alternate Mode, Thunderbolt 3 Alternate Mode, USB4, or Thunderbolt 4. Please make sure the cable supports data transfer, as some cables are meant to charge devices only. If you want to charge your mobile device through Spectrum, it needs to support the USB Power Delivery protocol. In this case, your cable also needs to be rated for at least the maximum power draw of your device, and is not recommended to exceed 2m of length.

Spectrum can be connected to any HDMI port with an HDMI cable. To ensure all the monitor’s features are available, make sure the cable is certified ‘Premium High-Speed HDMI’ for Model 1, or ‘Ultra High-Speed HDMI’ for Models 2 and 3.

Are there any negative side-effects to daisy-chaining monitors?

For Spectrum Model 1, daisy-chaining a second monitor through the first will limit the refresh rate of both to 60Hz.

What do I need to enable HDR support?

Your source device needs to have an HDMI 2.0a port or newer, a DisplayPort 1.4 port or newer, or a USB Type-C port that supports DisplayPort Alternate Mode. Additionally, your device needs to support the HDR10 Media Profile.

Does Spectrum have a Thunderbolt 3 port?

Spectrum does not have a Thunderbolt 3 port. It serves no purpose for the display itself; at best, it would allow for more extensive docking options for peripherals. Sticking to the USB, DisplayPort, and HDMI standards allow Spectrum to work with as broad a range as devices as possible.

Will Spectrum work on my Thunderbolt 3 device?

Because the Thunderbolt 3 Alternative Mode spec encompasses DisplayPort 1.2, you should be able to use Spectrum on your Thunderbolt 3-enabled device. You may incur limitations too, for example, resolution or refresh rate. If your Thunderbolt 3 port also specifically supports the DisplayPort Alternate Mode, there should be no such penalties.

Special Features

Will the monitor support pixel-perfect integer-ratio upscaling?

Yes. This will be the default behavior for input signals below native resolution, but it can also be turned off in the OSD. This will be a popular feature with retro gamers, keeping their pixel art from being blurred!

The exact resolutions supported and how each is handled, is being worked on by the firmware team.

How will Spectrum handle input signals at higher resolutions than native?

We don’t expect problems here, but just like exact upscaling methods and how they will be applied, the downscaling methods will also be tested and tweaked at a later prototyping stage. Of course, we will keep you informed!

Will Spectrum support various overdrive profiles?

Yes, we are working with BlurBusters to ensure the default profiles will provide a good experience right out of the box. Additionally, we offer a user-defined setting with granular control so that you can tweak it to your heart’s content.

Can Spectrum simultaneously use backlight strobing and variable refresh rates?

We intend to offer backlight strobing at variable refresh rates with a consistent overall brightness, similar to Asus’ ELMB technology. With adaptive sync and motion blur reduction being worked on by the firmware team, we should soon start testing more and more of these features to ensure they meet our standards.

Spectrum is not showing up on the website of Certification Company X. Is it really certified?

Since the monitor isn’t out yet, it won’t show up on anyone’s list of certified devices. By the time it ships, samples will have been sent out, tested, and certified as described (though it can take time for these lists to be updated). We have already been in contact with some of the bigger companies responsible for these certification tests, and expect no issues.

Will Spectrum be comfortable on my eyes?

Our aim is to meet TÜV Ergonomics, TÜV Flicker-Free, and TÜV Low Blue Light requirements. We will share new information as testing and certifications continue.

Will Spectrum’s firmware be open-source?

This is a planned feature, but the exact details are still being worked out. Some of the code in use belongs to our chip manufacturers and not to us, so we may not be able to publish any or all firmware code. We are finalizing the ability for end users to upgrade the firmware, so that the possibility is at least there!

Will there be Spectrum-specific software?

At this time, there are no plans to create custom supporting software for Spectrum.

Why is the Spectrum stand sold separately?

We are selling the monitor and its stand separately. That way, people who want to use a VESA monitor arm to mount their monitor (and our surveys showed that that’s quite a lot of people!) don’t have to pay for a part they don’t need. So people who don’t need it save money, but you don’t pay extra to get the stand.

I already have a monitor arm, will that work?

Apart from a mounting point for the Spectrum stand, the monitor has mounting holes that follow the VESA Mounting Interface Standard 100mm x 100mm.

Third-party stands that do not mount through the VESA standard are not supported.

Electrical and Operating Requirements

How is Spectrum powered?

Spectrum uses an external power adapter that connects to the monitor using its own plug, so it does not take up any of the monitor’s ports. We are looking for an adapter that is suitable for use around the world, accepting input ranging from 100-230V, with the wall plug on a replaceable cable using a C5, C7 or C13 plug or other such industry standards.

With the ability to deliver up to 100W of charging power through its USB Type-C port on top of its own power needs, it was unfeasible to use an internal power supply. It would add to the size of the monitor, and the added heat generation would necessitate adding a cooling fan to the design.

Warranty and Service

What is Spectrum’s warranty like?

The current draft of the Spectrum warranty policy can be found here. Key features include a 3-year limited warranty period, zero bright dot pixel policy, and 14-day DOA period with a new replacement and free shipping.

Can I pay extra for a perfect pixel guarantee?

We strive to provide panels without pixel defects to all our customers and have no plans for an additional paid pixel defect warranty at this time.

Design

How thick will Spectrum’s bezels be?

Model 1 is bounded by a thin frame to keep it in place and has an additional aluminum bottom bezel to cover up some electronic components. There is a thin border around the active display area. This combined ‘bezel’ measures approximately be 6mm left and right, 8mm on the top, and 20mm at the bottom.

Models 2 and 3 only have the thin frame to keep the panel in place and the border around the active display area. This border is part of the display panel itself, and cannot be removed – we could hide it with an actual bezel, but that would defeat the purpose. These combined ‘bezels’ measure approximately 5mm left and right and top, and 10mm at the bottom.

Why does Spectrum Model 1 have a bigger bottom bezel?

We would love to see completely bezel-less monitors, as the trend has been with, for instance, smartphones. However, the market for desktop panels has not caught up to this yet. Many display panels, including the one used for Model 1, have electronic parts that aren’t completely behind the display panel itself. The bottom bezel is there to hide them from view.

Will Spectrum feature edge-to-edge cover glass?

Though we really wanted to offer edge-to-edge cover glass, we were not able to get the display panel coating required to enable this option. As such, we’ll have a non-glossy panel with a low-haze anti-glare coating. Because of this same limitation, we can also not offer a non-glass glossy finish on Spectrum.

What cable management options do Spectrum offer?

The triangular hole through the Spectrum stand doesn’t just subtly refer to our company logo, it also offers an excellent location to bundle the cables connected to your monitor. Where you take them from there is all up to you. The possibilities are endless!

We have left a gap in the anti-slip pad at the base of the stand. This allows you to easily route cables for your keyboard and mouse back onto your desk.

Why is the housing around the bottom ports not the same as around the side ports?

Because of the way the housing is molded, it is not possible to manufacture it in one piece with ventilation at the top, and fitted ports on the side and bottom. We have looked into covering the bottom with a separate insert piece, but this added a relatively lot of complexity to the manufacturing and assembly process.

As the bottom ports are generally not in view, we opted to allow access to them through a large opening. We do paint the metal sub-frame so that Spectrum looks good even from below.

What materials is Spectrum made of?

The housing of Spectrum is made of high-quality plastics. Model 1 features an aluminum outer frame and bottom bezel. Due to the way the display panel is mounted in Models 2 and 3, the outer frame is part of the housing; therefore, it is also made of high-quality plastic. Spectrum’s stand is made of aluminum.

Will Spectrum or its stand be available in different colors?

At this time, just the color scheme as shown. That said, we are open to suggestions for the future.

How can I get my hands on those awesome renders of Spectrum?

We’ll try to post as many pictures as we can so that you can download, ogle, and share them to your heart’s content. That said, if we put everything out there all at once, we won’t have anything new left to share…

Third Parties

Will Eve call on external monitor experts like TFTcentral or RTINGS for tuning advice?

Totally – dependent on them being on board, of course. We have been in contact with journalists and influencers specialized in monitor performance, and some have expressed interest in working with us to make sure Spectrum looks its best. We will ask them to test prototypes and ask for feedback about tuning and changes. This will not just happen after release, but during the development process already.

Will Spectrum be sent to reviewers?

We can tell you it’s awesome, but we’re biased. And specs rarely paint a complete picture. So as we have done in the past, we will definitely make sure our monitor ends up in the hands of many of your favorite testers and reviewers. We haven’t yet decided who will receive Spectrum for review, but as we have done in the past, this is something we’ll definitely discuss with our community.

We want the reviews to give you an honest look at what Spectrum customers will receive. To that end, we will send final, finished units out to reviewers, from the same production line that customers’ monitors are shipped from. Reviewers will require time to test the product and create their content (a process that can take up to multiple weeks depending on the reviewer).

Until then, we do want you to hear first-hand opinions from people who aren’t part of the Eve team. In the past, we would have organized a community get-together where many community members can come together around a single prototype to geek out about tech. COVID-19 has made that a lot harder. Instead, we are working to send out some prototypes to community members to give you that non-Eve perspective.

Logistics and Timelines

Where will I be able to buy Spectrum?

The main point of sales will be our own web store. That said, we will also look into sales partners such as Amazon as we have done for the V, and are reaching out to physical retailers around the world to carry our products. This will give customers a physical point of contact and enables things like seeing the product before you buy it.

What is Spectrum’s price?

We have decided on a pricing model where the price increases dynamically based on sales. This has a number of benefits: we keep manufacturers and investors happy with high initial volumes, give our team peace of mind about the demand for our product, provide additional revenue later on to cover marketing, distribution, support, and reward our community of crowd-developers and early adopters with the best possible pricing. You were here first, and you deserve the best deal!

We don’t want to be perceived as a discount house making ‘cheaper products’. In fact, we feel our crowd-developed products are better than our competitors, using premium materials and packing all the extra features you want that improve the user experience. We always look to offer the best experience and the best value, not necessarily the lowest price. But if you also like low prices, you don’t have to wait for a sale to get a good deal: the best time to reserve your own Spectrum is always now!

What has been done to ensure setbacks from previous projects won’t affect Spectrum?

We’ve changed our business model and the way sales are handled to avoid a number of issues that have plagued us in the past. More details about what changed can be found in this topic.

When will Spectrum ship?

At this time, the Model 3 is estimated to ship June 29th, 2021, followed by Model 2 on July 09th. Model 1 will follow later in Q3 2021. Shipping estimates are updated as more information becomes available. It is already possible to reserve the monitor on our order page, where you can also always find the latest shipping date estimate for each model.

I have questions about payment, shipping, or warranty

Please have a look at our Balance Payment FAQ, there’s a good chance your question is answered there!

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Thank you, @Helios that was a great, and very technically informative read. I’m sure if anyone as any technical questions they should be able to find the answers here. Thanks for taking the time to write this post in the QNA style. Really easy to follow.

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Now that was extremely informative and answered a lot of questions I was thinking about. Thanks for the detailed info!

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Just as an FYI, the “VESA mount compatible” section appears twice in the spec chart about 3 or 4 entries apart

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“a dynamic inverted color which makes the crosshair stand out no matter what is in your sights.”

Thank you!

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Lol - I’m 100% with Keno - that one feature made me happy like you cannot believe.

You can bet on the fact that I’ll be using the Eve logo as my 'crosshair"…

I’ve not lost any enthusiasm for this project at all since fist signing up only a few months ago, but I’m stoked again after reading all of this. Thank you, @Helios !

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@Helios To make sure you play up your strengths, I think the specs (perhaps here, but definitely in listings outside this forum) should include the following bits of information:

  • Inclusion of “Gen 2” also for the USB-C upstream. It’s infuriating how vendors always list the more or less irrelevant USB standard like 3.0, 3.1, 3.2 in spec sheets but leave out the actual interesting bit, which is data transfer speed. You support Gen 2. Most monitors don’t. Make sure people notice. On that front, a label for the Type-B upstream would also be nice.
  • For the stand, be clear whether it rotates in both directions (I believe it does, right?) or only one way. Important data point for prospective portrait mode users.

Now, on to read the remainder of the long Q&A. Good stuff!

I’m not an expert on color lookup tables, but it seems like you’ll want to take the “3D LUT calibration profile stored in firmware” bit out of your official specs page to avoid false advertising and all of its potential consequences.

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HOLY SH*T :star_struck::star_struck::star_struck: Those are some detailed and great news! THUMBS UP!!!

I especially like that you integrated DSC for the 4K model. That means that I can use the monitor using 144hz with my M1 MacMini :+1:

Can’t wait to receive my Spectrum! Seems like it was worth the wait 100% due to a lot improvements made by you since then!!!:fire:

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Unsolicited Proofread Pesto! Sorry and thank you.

*certifications

If you’re talking about this topic, and not shipping cables for all customers by default, you may also want to talk about differences in cable bandwidth. USB-C is widely known to make unprepared customers cry in pain because they thought a cable that fits (and even transfers data!) will just work. 1440p@240Hz or 4K@144Hz don’t just work with any old 480 Mbps cable. I think.

That doesn’t sound too encouraging. I’m looking forward to an update on this topic sometime in the next month or two.

I’m sure you have real photos now. Perhaps a candidate for some rephrasing, if you’re going to use this text elsewhere in the future.

I’d like to note that there is no note of how much wattage is consumed by the monitor. Sure, gamers might not care much about extra power consumption if the graphics card alone already burns hundreds of watts just by itself. But for a device that may draw more power than the USB-C laptop that it’s powering (depending on brightness, etc.), I hope this important piece of information can be added to the specs soon.

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Nice to see the April 20th date reiterated! Looking forward to making the full payment and receiving the “Your item has been dispatched” email!

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Thanks for the huge update!

Would it be possible for ∆E calibration to be an option some of us could pay for? Alternatively, do you know if a future firmware update could remedy the storing of user color calibration profiles? This seems like a thing most other high-end monitors have no problem with. I would definitely pay a premium to get it factory calibrated, but short of that I would at least want the chance of calibrating it later myself.

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The user can either manually select the source port for the built-in USB hub, or let Spectrum decide. If set to automatic selection, the USB-C port will be used for the hub when USB-C is set as the image source, or the USB-B port will be used for the hub when HDMI or DisplayPort is set as the image source.

This is by far the biggest deal to me. I wanted a screen I could use for work on my Mac and for games on my PC, and having all my USB devices switch over when a single source is set is going to be so awesome. The only thing missing is switching inputs as a shortcut in the OSD (maybe just thumbing the joystick up/down without clicking first?). I think that was talked about at some point, is that still on the cards?

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I like the idea of the cross hair options, on top of changing colors and shape, if we could also adjust the size that’d be :ok_hand:.

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I’m not sure if that would be doable, but if it can be I’ll throw my support behind it - my eyes aren’t getting any younger, that’s for sure!

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@Helios at what point will you able to let us know if you were able to meet those requirements or not? What should be done to meet it?


@Lore_Wonder Is there any news from the testing site? :slight_smile:

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Hey, @farvz! We’ll share more news on testing Spectrum with MacBook later.

Update 02 Apr:

P1001299-Enhanced
M1 MacBook Air running Spectrum in 4K at 144Hz.

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MacBook uses IPS panels, correct? I know that photo is most likely from a phone but that black level is a night a day difference.

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I think you can not really compare those from a picture because the Mac could be running on a much lower brightness setting and the refelections also could change the impression. So I guess only a propper review can give a true impression here.

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@Nic01060 is definitely right about the Mac’s brightness level. Both screens are showing the same background image, and the Spectrum is clearly set at a much higher brightness level. Key areas to look at are:

  • The red that makes up the main part of the Eve triangle. The brightest part of the Macbook’s triangle is fairly close in colour to the dark halo around the Spectrum’s triangle.
  • The grey portions of the Eve logo at the bottom-left of the image. The letters on the Spectrum clearly stand out, whereas on the Macbook screen they’re a lot harder to see.

If you turned down the brightness of the Spectrum to match the Macbook, the black level would probably be very similar. After all, both the Macbook and the Spectrum are using IPS panels, so they should perform similarly.

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I get that, but that was one of my concerns with the panel they’re using. I’m a fan of HDR, and with HDR you want your brightness (panel lighting, not black level) maxed out. I had hopes with the talk of FALD with this panel, but they’re not going that route. Just take a look at the LG 27GN950-B black uniformity, which is the same panel Eve is using.

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