Project: Spectrum | Prototype Repairs & Updates

Agreed, but could be something Eve could consider :+1:.

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Seriously a great update.
You can see the monitor and the improvements you’ve made through the software iterations.
Would be great if you could keep this up.
Maybe do some gaming on PC and consoles after the firmware gets more mature, it’s always nice to see the things you write about in the updates.

I have some questions left:
A:
What is the measurement of the rectangle where the stand or the VESA Mount is inserted? (X, Y and Z)
I would like to 3D print a cover so my VESA mount lines up with the backplate.
(Or maybe you can supply it as an addon with the same material? :grimacing: )

B:
is there a cover under the screw holes, so you don’t screw them in the PCB? Else this could become a problem for some people.

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I agree, in my experience, which spans over 20 years in electronics service, support, inspection & test, and R&D, companies generally don’t offer replacement parts down to the component level for many reasons.

  1. If replacing the part requires special tools or skills/training.
  2. If replacement process requires customers to work near dangerous components (uninsulated high voltage conductors. large capacitors or sharp/pointy edges).
  3. If the company will lose money on maintaining the inventory beyond what is needed for production and warranty support.
  4. Losing money on the development of customer orderable parts infrastructure (orderable part numbers, web site modifications, order taking & tracking efforts, customer support and warehouse staff) needed to provide parts out of warranty.

What companies will often do is identify any Field Replaceable Units (FRUs), these are major components that anyone could safely swap out or install, such as the monitor stand assembly, power brick assembly, a firmware flashing tool, or even the external joystick, in this case. They would then determine how many of each will likely be needed, create separate orderable SKUs, bills of material (BOMs), packaging, documentation, account for any stand alone regulation and compliance requirements, train order entry folks how to identify and transact orders, including any SKUs that may be different on the different product models., etc. etc.

As you can see, it’s not a simple (or inexpensive) process, and while FRU prices are designed to recover the costs and include a profit margin, these sales are difficult to forecast with great accuracy. You might sell a ton or you might not sell any, however the costs are guaranteed, and the risk is compounded with each FRU.

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With B you mean to screw them into the LCD from the backside?

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No, the pcb on the back, not the screen.

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I love the updates , I can’t wait to get my 4K model connected to my Series X. Glad to see things shaping up. Keep up the good work and keep those updates coming. I’m here for the long haul and am glad I made my reservation!!

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Yes I was wondering that! Some stands come with their own screws which are different lengths - perhaps @Lore_Wonder knows if there is anything stopping you inserting the screw “too far” and it damaging the electronics behind?

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When we are able to replace the damaged parts ourselves is it interrupting the warranty?
It would be great to have an option to replace the joystick circuit without interrupting the warranty.

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We’ll take it into account and will share more information about the warranty later.

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This is great to see! While I have no technical skills that would enable me to do this the fact things are not locked and soldered in a way that makes user repair impossible.

Prob not entirely planned but looks quite modular and easy to work with.

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Thanks for the insight! Never would have thought so much issues could arrise with being able to provide replacement parts.

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Having hung a few TVs and monitors now using VESA, it comes down to using the correct screws. According to the videos, it seems as if the Spectrums actually come with their own screws pre-installed in the screw holes, and the metal plate that actually serves as the VESA mount itself underneath the back cover is what actually limits the travel of the shank - the head cannot go any farther than the plate.

However, since there seems to be a part of the plastic back actually in the recessed hold for the VESA mount (see 1:20 to 1:50 of the video above), there is definitely a concern, as if that plastic gets degraded in some manner (or, perhaps, broken off by an overenthusiastic user like myself who always likes to get just that extra little bit of torque on the screw) then it would allow for the shank to travel that much further into the hole. Even if it is only a single mm, that could be devastating.

So, yes, as the monitor ships I doubt there will be an issue if you use the screws that come with the monitor, and even less chance of a PCB strike by the shank of the screw(s) with a mount (as the mount will add greater spacing, limiting shank travel even more). Really, the only things you’ll (possibly) have to be worried about are:

  1. If you use a different screw with a longer shank, or
  2. If, after using a mount for some time, you revert to using the stand, and attempt to put the screws back into their respective holes, but the back cover in that recessed area is damaged / degraded / flat-out missing.

Still, though, a ‘cap’ or spacer or divider or something to prevent the screw, any screw, to travel past a certain point would be a really good idea. Not only because of possible PCB damage, but also panel damage.

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Nice text. Normaly there is a Stop that you cannot damage the panel with the shipped screws, only if you Use Other, longer or sharped screws like you Said.
But I am also rethinking buying the stand

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It’s 120.8mm × 120.8mm × 5.25mm.

It’s not something we plan to work on.

Yes. Spectrum has a metal cover at the end of the four screw holes. See the picture below:

Four screw holes
The tiny hole at the end of the four screw holes is created by a cone-shaped drill that manufactures the screw holes.

Typical 100mm × 100mm VESA mount screws have the same threading as that of Spectrum’s four screws at the back. Therefore, as long as the VESA mount manufacturer sticks with the standard, Spectrum should be compatible with the screws that come with a VESA mount.

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I like how all the screws are “of the shelf philips” or “+” ones. Whenever I Open a device And find 4 or 5 different kinds of screw heads not even from the same family and “exotic” ones… Ugh!

Plus the pieces don’t need to come in at weird angles, or are glued, or fused using ultrasounds… very nice.

The whole device is going to get a very good repair score on iFixit for sure.

Good job on the video BTW, you don’t need to be a profesional Youtuber. Ofcourse a Cat appearence would have made it much better. :stuck_out_tongue:

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That is excellent news. So, unless you really do try to massively over tighten the screws into the mount, you should have 0 issues with the setup. Using standard threading is a big bonus for all the VESA mounts out there that supply their own screws, as well.

Thanks!

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These are M4’s correct? Do we know the recommended length? I think 10-12mm is pretty common.

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Yes, they’re M4. I have confirmed that 10-12mm is the recommended screw length for connecting a VESA mount to Spectrum.

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I’m surprised it’s so easy to open it up. No glue or proprietary screws. I see there are many experts about product repair in this thread, it’s very interesting to see all the details I normally would not consider about this topic. I hope Eve can provide some parts for repair at the users risk, but reading some very detailed comments in this thread I can see the reasons why it might not be very convenient.

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One thing to bare in mind is EU/UK customers have just gained the right to repair covering a number of electrical goods which includes monitors. This is only for professional repairers, but does mean that rather than having to ship the monitor out of the country, you can get someone who runs a repair business to fix it as the manufacturer has to provide them with parts and instructions to repair.

Hopefully EVE is well aware of this law and is preparing appropriately.

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