Not understanding what setting expections is


#1

I along with a colleague of mine were amongst the initial backers on this endeavor and have a pending order for a third device. I’ve been in the tech business for over thirty years. My college roommate is the guy who managed hardware roll out including what this device is supposed to have improved upon for MS till recently. To say that I’m not impressed is putting it mildly. As we all know plans are one thing, execution is another. If you can’t anticipate bumps on the road, then you’ll learn the hard way that building anything requires more than just getting the parts together, although that one aspect of it. To try the same approach and expect a different result is just silly. Trying to learn as you go is downright foolish. Great ideas fail all the time, often because people with great ideas often have no clue how to execute. You must at some point relinquish some responsibilities to the people with the know-how. There are several contract manufacturers scattered across this planet that take your plans and manage procurement, manufacturing, burn-in, and QC. To experience production delays a year after the first shipment is simply unacceptable.
Our initial devices were shipped with the wrong version of the OS, received accessories we did not order, and received items we can’t use. The initial response was “Sorry for the delay and subsequent issues with your order”. That was extent of customer service. Customer service is a misunderstood concept for most companies. Customer Service is not a claim you make. It is a process which begins the moment your Customer returns with an issue and you begin to address and “remedy” the problem, not provide a list of excuses. When I inquired about my second order that was placed back in January along with another excuse, I received a note that I could check the status of my order by simply logging in to the order status page, which to this day says “unfulfilled”. I have been very quiet for nearly two years only because I understand the challenges they are facing to a degree. Having said that, I also believe that at some point one must call it what it is and not be the enabler.