Larger Eve V - Eve V+ maybe?


#61

Those of us with a few more years under our belt and less than perfect eyesight! Downside though carrying round the larger device


#62

I agree V+ for performance V for mobility. I chose V because of its great specs and the mobility of the device.

If I need a bigger version, I don’t think I will carry it around with me. I would want something like surface studio.


#63

It does support pdf. And I have no idea how your digital editions work, so can’t answer this one. But if they run in a browser, as an Android app, or if you can download them, they do work. Pretty much every e-reader now has a web browser, many of them run Android, and ALL of them can open downloaded files in a bazillion of formats.

Then download the app, geez…
That being said, e-readers come with quite good software out of the box, so even if they don’t run Android, there’s plenty of configuration options.

Oh, have I told you e-readers also support PDF? Oh wait, I have. Why are you still whining about PDF?

It runs all the apps on Play store. What else do you need? I mean seriously, please get down on the ground. It’s an e-reader, it’s not supposed to replace your PC. Or your tablet. Or your phone. Or anything else in fact, except paper books. Just tell me one feature that you need for an e-reader and that isn’t available for Android 4.0… They’re all useless for e-readers.

Please do some research before posting such things lol… A scanned PDF page takes around 100kB on average. So you can have 320000 pages. And that’s only counting scanned pages. Other material takes less space.


#64

Good. So find me a way to read the new york review of books or the london review of books, or the economist, or … without android; check whether the apps run correctly on e-ink readers. Find an e-reader that runs powerpoint (did I mention that not all conference presentations are converted into pdf?). And will accept a 128gb micro sd. I would love to have such a reader, if not for any other reason, at least because of battery life.

And when you do find that Holy Grail we will take it from there. Until then, please do not presume you know my needs better than me, or that I am an idiot who does not see the light. Ony Apple fanboys behave like that and you are not one.


#65

Eh, same points again…

A 2GB card holds thousands of books.

http://www.nybooks.com/ <-- go here, click on article, read.

https://www.lrb.co.uk/ <-- go here, click on article, read.

https://www.economist.com/ <-- go here, click on article, read.

You get the picture…

Yes, as long as it runs Android. Or you can just use the websites.

It does, as long as it runs Android.

Do it yourself, what’s the fuss? It’s one click of a button, you can use your phone, tablet, PC, anything. If you just want a quick look at the presentation and it’s not worth the effort, then it’s definitely not worth lugging around a big screen.

Well, seems like I just found it. Any e-reader. Or if you really want apps (although all the examples you gave can work perfectly fine without any non-stock apps), any e-reader with Android.


#66

My e-library does not fit in 2Gb (never mind its size), so please do not presume that you know how much storage it needs. I want to read my lrb and nyrb through an app that allows me to download and store several issues of the periodical, rather than connect to the web and browse one article at a time.
But of course there is no way that I could possibly know my needs than you; by the way - you still have not suggested any half decent android e-reader that will run the apps properly.
Sorry, your last smartass answer was worthy of an apple fanboy and puts an end to the conversation. For good.


#67

Oh, and you read every book you have every day? Come on, you’re smarter than that… No need to keep everything on the e-reader…

Here’s an example:
https://www.amazon.com/Barnes-Noble-NOOK-GlowLight-eReader/dp/B01MYQWLTV/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ll1&tag=ter000-20&linkId=5aa786961c7e5f3da3c8df3f77987fe0


#68

I would add to Pauliunas’s point by adding that you don’t honestly even need the e-reader to run android. My Kobo links up to my Pocket account and downloads whatever articles/files I have on there.

Plus it has a microSD slot on it, though I can’t speak to if it is compatible with 128gb cards as I’ve ever put larger than 32gb into it. Even with a quite sizeable collection of pdfs and epubs I’ve yet to get past a gigabyte of storage used, so I’m curious what you’re storing that would burn enough space that 128gb would be necessary (just saying it’s periodicals and journals isn’t helping me, as I have plenty saved myself and they aren’t a significant contributor in my case).

That said, I do use a microSD in mine if only because it’s often easier for me to copy files about with a microSD than syncing the ereader up to a computer.


#69

Let’s say he reads lots of newspapers… ok… I get that, he saves them in PDF, which is not a well compressed file format, especially with lots of pictures… But you know, you don’t need to keep 2 years old newspapers on your SD card. You’re right, it’s hard to actually pass the 1GB mark, I’d probably have to download everything I can find online without looking. And we’re talking over 100GB here.


#70

I dont download books, but if I did I suspect they would be reference manual, which tend to be half pictures. Would that make a difference in overall size.?


#71

Of course… just compare any jpg file with any txt file on your computer. Most probably the jpg will be at least 100x bigger. The same applies to the content in ebooks. But you can just download one of those manuals and see for yourself…


#72

I wonder what it looked like if Eve took on a project like the Surface Studio.


#73

Exactly - eg a Kindle version of an anatomy atlas is at least 500MB; not to mention that I doubt if any one in his right mind would try to use a black and white e-ink screen to consult it.


#74

I’d be glad to move to a bigger V in the future. I was always a hater of small devices. Probably because I’ve tried my dad’s netbook. Don’t know how big it was but it was plain horrible. So I’ve bought 15.6’ ASUS for myself. And I enjoy a big screen.


#75

I wouldn’t really recommend larger than 15.6. I think they’re too immobile at that point. Too heavy, too hard to maneuver if holding it, hard to store it, more likely to bend or warp or dent it if it falls. 15.6 is max for me but I prefer 14, it sounds like a better medium. I’d be interested in a powerful 14 inch convertible 360 hinge computer.


#76

Yeah! 15.6’ is good for a laptop. It has can have a full keyboard, a decent screen and will fit a normal sized backpack. I have no idea how V will be at my hands. So we will see that.
It just seems like 12’ is a small screen, but we will find out that when will get V’s on our hands.


#77

I agree with it @Mohammad_Hadi 15.6 is too heavy, unless you’re talking about some super ultra book lightweight model. My old 15.6 was defo not very portable at all!


#78

You mean… Asus Zenbook for example? There are plenty of light laptops nowadays, actually most of them are lighter than yours, most probably. It sounds like you have a laptop with a 45W CPU, and those are indeed heavy. But nowadays most laptops are made with 15W CPUs and they’re much much lighter.


#79

Yeah probably, and a couple of rocks in there as well for ballast I reckon! Sadly I can’t check as I sold it at a car boot sale already!


#80

Good old computer memory.
My first portable (=laptop today) was 9 kilograms (roughly 17 / 18 pounds) including the nickel cadmium battery. The 2 hours lifetime batteries died rather fast, but the laptop itself (with the intel 386 chip) never died. It was not used anymore after no windows program could work with it anymore)